Checking In
Lesson 15noobie Turkish Noobie
Checking In
Unless you plan on sleeping on the streets during your trip to Turkey (hey, might be fun), the hotel check-in is unavoidable. Don't worry about finding a clandestine alley just yet - we're here to help.
Checking into a hotel.
Psst! Want to access
everything in this lesson?
mina
how can I find correct answer?
May 22, 2013
Justin
We're adding something soon. What are you having trouble with? :)
May 22, 2013
mina
I want to check my answer because I had some mistake
May 22, 2013
Husam
I think you mean the third group. put: T,T,F,F,T,T.
May 24, 2013
Ahmed
Having trouble in the fourth and fifth questions , help :))
May 31, 2013
Justin
Okay! We added a feature to reveal the answers. Enjoy :)
Jul 16, 2013
Kirk
Hi Justin and the rest of the crew!

I just want to say that this is a great website.

Just have one comment on the fourth question of the review. The phrase Dort kisilik var mi (sorry dont have the correct keyboard) is given as a correct answer, but I think you may have accidentally left out "oda".

thanks
kirk
Jul 21, 2013
Yousuf
Merhaba Turkish Tea Time Team.
I have a comment on fifth question. In the question it was asked "Ask if there is a table (masa) for three people" but in the correct answer one (bir) is missing. In other words correct answer should be : Üç kişilik bir masa var mı? instead of "Üç kişilik masa var mı." Please correct me if I am wrong. Teşekkürler
Nov 11, 2013
Justin
Merhaba Yousuf!

You are exactly right that's a completely correct answer. I added it to the list of accepted responses.

In colloquial usage, our Turkish natives here agree that "Üç kişilik masa var mı" sounds more natural to them, but that "üç kililik bir masa" is in no way weird. They do note that in the "bir" sentence, bir is spoken very quickly.

And @Kirk - I'm sorry we never replied. You are right and I added the word "oda" as you suggested.

Thanks so much to you both.
Nov 11, 2013
Maherove
Merhaba Turkish Tea Time Team.
thanks for your great efforts
Feb 23, 2014
Isabela
best web site! :)
Mar 29, 2014
Libbi
can you clarify the difference between "ne kadar" and "kaç"?
Apr 18, 2014
Justin
Good question! We should do a lesson on that.

Broadly speaking, ne kadar is "how much" and is used in non-countable cases. Kaç is "how many" and used in cases that are countable.

Peynir kaç lira? = How many liras is the cheese?
Peynir ne kadar? = How much is the cheese?

Kaç tane ekmek var? = How many pieces of bread are there?
Ne kadar ekmek kaldı? = How much bread is left?

Ne kadar şeker istiyorsun? = How much sugar do you want?
Kaç tane şeker istiyorsun? = How many cubes of sugar do you want?
Apr 22, 2014
Justin
Ah, I knew we had done something. For some more examples, check out the language points in Lesson 15:

https://turkishteatime.com/lesson/15/#languagepoints
Apr 22, 2014
Andrew
Hi Justin, very helpful site.

In the language points section it says:
Kaç tane kedi var?
How many cats are there?

Why do we need tane? I want to translate it as how many pieces of cat are there?
Mar 05, 2015
Justin
Thanks!

"Kaç kedi var" is grammatically fine and according to Büşra, actually preferred in spoken Turkish.

Tane doesn't literally translate to "piece." Sometimes it does, but it's usually used as the default measure word that Turkish likes to use when using numerical adjectives. But, as you can see from this example, it's not required in many cases.
Mar 05, 2015
Ward Family
Merhaba Justin! Thanks for this lesson. Now I won't mess up.
May 26, 2015
Rouba
Merhaba Justin. I have a question please :)
Why is "ne kadar para" wrong? Doesn't it translate to how much money? or do we use another phrase for that?
Jun 15, 2016
Justin
Hi Rouba! Good question :)

"Ne kadar para" doesn't really translate to that. It would be more like saying "How many money?"

In Turkish, money is considered countable, so you want to use "kaç" instead of "ne kadar" - as in, "kaç para?" I know this might seem confusing, because unlike Turkish, English considers money uncountable (how MUCH money instead of how MANY money). Grammatically speaking, I mean.

Now, having said that, it turns out that simply saying "Ne kadar?" is an extremely common and acceptable way to ask "how much does this cost." But you can't say "ne kadar para."
Jun 18, 2016
Rouba
Thank you for making it perfectly clear! :)
Jun 19, 2016
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