Vowel Harmony
Lesson 43noobie Turkish Noobie
Vowel Harmony
Vowel harmony is the single biggest challenge to new Turkish learners. Join us today as we chat in detail about this part of the language and learn to harmonize like a barber shop quartet.
Vowel harmony.
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Öğrenci
Assalamu alaikum..I am From Pakistan..My Name is Hira arif Qadri...i am female...i am Good in English and in my Native Language Urdu..i am much Interested in Learning The Turkish Language..i want to learn it as soon as possible..i had really fun here..Thank you Alot.. :)
May 01, 2013
Öğrenci
:)
May 01, 2013
MJ
Well-explained.
May 18, 2013
Öğrenci
Thanks Justin and Bengi. Now I can spell and understand the vowel harmony
your great
Oct 10, 2013
Martha
Merhaba. May I make a suggestion? I think it is a little confusing to say that şekerli means "with sugar." I say this because it took me a long time to separate the -le,-la suffix and the -li, -lı, -lu, -lü suffix in my mind when I first learned about them. The former mean "with" and the latter mean "having," yes? At least for English speakers, I think the "having" translation helps separate these ideas. ... Dersleriniz için cok teşekkür ederim!
Jan 10, 2014
Justin
Merhaba Martha - this is an excellent suggestion and we agree completely. It actually gives us an idea for a lesson ;-)
Jan 10, 2014
Lilla
Very well explained, çok teşekkür ederim! :)

It would also be interesting to have a lesson on those pesky words that don't actually follow vowel harmony, like "saat" for example. There are only a few but they always give me a hard time.

İyi günler arkadaşlar! :)
Mar 03, 2014
Justin
Merhaba Lilla! Check out Lesson 132 for an explanation of a lot of these cases. (Unfortunately, a few are just weird having come from Arabic - like saat.)

https://turkishteatime.com/lesson/132/
Mar 03, 2014
Lilla
Süper! Teşekkürler! :)
Mar 03, 2014
Öğrenci
In speaking , iImad almost of them wrong :( ,,,, Nahh ,, it's difficult to me
Apr 07, 2014
Öğrenci
The native Turkish speaker sounds like she's putting a slight "sh" sound at the end of ler/lar. Is this a dialect of some sort? I don't hear it when the native English speaker says them.
Nov 03, 2014
Justin
It's not an "sh" exactly - it's a roll on the r very similar (but less pronounced) as you would find in Spanish. You hear it on words that end in r. It's standard Istanbul Turkish (Büşra speaks with no discernible accent).

I, however, most certainly do have an American accent when speaking Turkish - so while I hope my speaking Turkish is motivating for others, don't try to mimic my pronunciation. Büşra is the gold standard.
Nov 03, 2014
Can
In the dialog it reads "partine kim gelecek?"

Can anyone explain why it isn't "parti-y-e"? I would've thought that the -y- buffer would've been used in this case.
Nov 26, 2014
Can
nevermind, I was being stupid, I realised it was YOUR party..
Nov 26, 2014
Miko
In the language points section, in the I type vowel harmony section, it says, "The i version follows i and e (both front, unrounded), the ı version follows ı and a (back, unrounded), the u version follows u and o (back, unrounded), and the ü version follows ü and ö (back, rounded). The i and ı version seem correct to me, but shouldn't the u and o version be (back, rounded) and the ü version be (front, rounded) ?
Jan 18, 2015
Justin
Yep! You are exactly right. All fixed. Çok teşekkür ederiz :)
Jan 18, 2015
Öğrenci
Salam
following words are common between arabic and turkish with slight difference,relating help memorizing.

Fıstık
şey
şeker
Ders
Merhaba
Teşekkür
Jul 25, 2015
Öğrenci
In the dialog where it has ayrıca, is she actually saying this or did she replace it with another word? I can't make it out.
Sep 25, 2015
Thomas
Justin, the word "to the party," shouldn't it be "partiye" with a 'y' buffer? Çok teşekküler.
Oct 26, 2015
Dün
I am definitely not Justin, but maybe he won't mind if I answer. :)
For the first one: I hear "ayrıca" in the dialog, she is saying it pretty fast (especially the end of the word), and a little bit together with "tuzsuz", but it's "ayrıca" to my ears.
To the second question: I had a trouble with that first time too, I was walking on the streets, listening it and thinking, why is the buffer "n" now instead of "y"? Then I realised (just like Can above) that it's not "to the party", it is "to your party". "Partin" is "your party" and "partine" is to your party.

(Sorry for answering instead of Justin and sorry for my really bad english, I am hungarian, and it's not an excuse for bad english, but at least it is explaining it why is it sooo bad, not just simply bad. :) )
Nov 21, 2015
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